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Estimating the cost of sanitation infrastructure for selected sites in Khayelitsha in City of Cape Town

Authors: Conrad Barberton, Jonathan Carter, Matthew Townshend
Date: 2016-04-19

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The South African Constitution identifies access to sufficient water as a right. There is no similar right of access to sanitation. However, the South African Human Rights Commission holds that access to sanitation is integral to realising “other rights including rights to dignity, education, health, safety and the environment.” Based on the fact that “the state must take reasonable legislative and other measures, within its available resource to achieve the progressive realisation of the right” to have access to sufficient water, it is reasonable to expect that a similar obligation rests on the state with regards to providing access to an acceptable standard of sanitation in light of its close connection to the realisation of other rights.

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Costing the Children’s Protection and Welfare Act, 2011 of Lesotho

Authors: Conrad Barberton, Jonathan Carter and Carmen Abdoll
Date: 2014-05-31

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This UNICEF-commissioned report provides a costing of the Children’s Protection and Welfare Act No. 7 of 2011 in order for the Government of Lesotho to make informed decisions regarding the phasing-in of the different services provided for in the Act. The costing exercise entailed the development of three scenarios. The Fixed Scenario envisions service provision to all children in need of care and protection, and provides a 20-year vision. Scenario 1 illustrates the costs of service provision to the baseline number of children, but in accordance with the norms and standards laid out in the Act, while Scenario 2 estimates the costs of increasing the governmental capacity to serve ten times the number of children as the baseline.

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Costing the South African Public Library and Information Services Bill

Authors: Conrad Barberton, Jonathan Carter and Carmen Abdoll
Date: 2013-08-30

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In 2012, the national Department of Arts and Culture drafted the South African Public Library and Information Services Bill, 2012, which aims to ensure that a prescribed level of library services is provided to the public. According to the Constitution, this function falls within the mandate of the provincial governments, and this report investigates the funding levels required to meet a prescribed set of minimum norms and standards for delivery of public library and information services.

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The Cost of the Children’s Bill

Author: Conrad Barberton
Date: 2006-09-01

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This project is an activity-based costing of the Children’s Bill, and is comprised of the analysis of four costing scenarios. The report finds that, at the time of costing, the provision for children at risk was under-funded for existing obligations, regardless of the further provision envisaged by the Bill. For this reason, the report called for care in prioritising services, since capacity to deliver can only expand at about 10 per cent per year. The report also calls for the government to make full use of profit and non-profit organisations for delivery, given the limited capacity of the government to deliver.

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Re-Costing the Child Justice Bill

Author: Conrad Barberton
Date: 2001-05-01

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Though this re-costing of the Child Justice Bill (1998) was originally written for AFReC (Pty) Ltd, Conrad Barberton, the founder of Cornerstone, is the author. It’s relevance and importance lies in that the Child Justice Bill was the first bill in South Africa to be fully costed during the drafting process prior to enactment and implementation.

The Child Justice Bill, a draft of which was released in December 1998 for comment, was costed in early 1999 and the report was published in Costing the Implementation of the Child Justice Bill & Developinga Strategy for Implementation, Monograph No.14 (November 1999) of the AFReC (UCT) Monograph Series. Following changes to the proposed Child Justice Bill (some as a result of the costing itself), such as the introduction of the preliminary enquiry and the wider use of diversion and alternative sentencing, as well as the proposal to implement a more comprehensive child justice monitoring system, it was requested that AFReC (Pty) Ltd. re-cost the bill, taking into account these and other changes. This report analyses three scenarios — baseline, full and rollout —in costing the goals of this bill.

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